SYDNEY, March 10 - Girls aged five to 12 are being encouraged to dress up in their favourite heroine's costume while they learn about STEM on Superhero Daughter Days being held in major cities during March. 

It's all part of a program designed to entice more girls to pursue careers in jobs such as coding, civil engineering, information technology and architecture that are often dominated by men.

Building bridges out of spaghetti and marshmellows, making wearable tech, programmable friendship bracelets and playing with robotics are just a few of what the girls will learn in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Hobart or Townsville. 

The day is the brainchild of co-founder Gemma Lloyd who wants parents to encourage their daughters to pursue such careers in the weeks, months and years to come.

"I had a six-year-old girl who came up to me and said 'This is the best day of my life'," Lloyd said. 

"It is also important we encourage gender diversity in the workforce for both men and women." 

Women make up less than 20 per cent of all Australians qualified in STEM subjects and they're paid less than their male colleagues, a 2016 report by the chief scientist's office found. 

Tech Girls Movement founder Jenine Beekhuyzen said the event is aimed at primary school aged girls before their inquisitive minds are compromised by gender stereotypes.

Superhero Daughter Days are being held in Sydney and Brisbane on Saturday.

Similar events will be held in Hobart, Perth, Melbourne and Auckland later this month.

AAP